Wilsons Promontory

The Prom is a bushwalker's paradise with short, day and overnight walks. Popular short walks include Norman Bay, Squeaky Beach, Whisky and Picnic Bays. Kangaroos and emus are in abundance in the aerodrome area. Tidal River has camping and accommodation, shop and information centre. The boardwalk at Tidal River is wheelchair accessible. Norman Bay beach is patrolled daily between Boxing and Australia Day. Visitors are asked not to feed any wildlife.

 

 

Wilsons Promontory

Mount Oberon

Wilsons Promontory

Mount Oberon Summit Walk

Wilsons Promontory

Mount Oberon

Wilsons Promontory

Picnic Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Picnic Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Picnic Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Picnic Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Whisky Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Whisky Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Whisky Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Whisky Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Whisky Bay

Wilsons Promontory

Wilsons Promontory

Tidal River: Norman Beach

Wilsons Promontory

Tidal River

Whale Rock

Wilsons Promontory

Wilsons Promontory

Tidal River: Whale Rock

Tidal River

Wilsons Promontory

Wilsons Promontory

Tidal River: Bird life

Wilsons Promontory Road

Wilsons Promontory

Wilsons Promontory Road

Wilsons Promontory

Norman Beach Car Park Picnic Table

Wilsons Promontory

Darby Saddle

Wilsons Promontory

Kangaroos & Emus

Wilsons Promontory

Emu

Wilsons Promontory

Wilsons Promontory

Cotters Lake: Joey

Wilsons Promontory

Lighthouse Cottage 5

Wilsons Promontory

Lighthouse Cottages

Wilsons Promontory

Skull Rock

Cotters Lake and Beach

(1.2 km, 30 mins. Easy) Start at the Cotters Lake Carpark and follow the management vehicle track past the gate to the beach. Cotters Beach has all the charm of a wild, wind swept stretch of coast. The track to the beach passes through the often dry basin of Cotters Lake, with the surrounding vegetation sheltering wildlife, including kangaroos and emus. With the right tide conditions it’s possible to walk for miles, beachcombing through all the amazing flotsam and jetsam that the tides wash up. Please leave behind what you find as all plant, animal and natural features in the national park are protected.

Darby Beach

(1.1 km from carpark. Easy) A sandy track leads to this small exposed beach, embraced at both ends by rocky headlands. The fragile sand dunes erode faster when people climb up them. Please stay on the beach. Access: from Darby River Carpark.

Lilly Pilly Gully Circuit

(5.8 km, 2 - 3 hours return. Moderate) Starting at the Lilly Pilly Gully Carpark, the circuit offers all the highlights of walk 7 but allows those who have more energy and time to enjoy the high route back to the carpark through the tall stringy-bark forest. One rest spot offers a view over Tidal River to Norman Bay. It is easier to complete the circuit in a clockwise direction, starting from the Mt Bishop Track (to the left of the toilets).

Lilly Pilly Gully Nature Walk

(2.6 km, 1 hour. Easy. Suitable for prams) Starting at the Lilly Pilly Gully Carpark, this track passes through a wide variety of plant communities. A section of boardwalk at the end of the nature walk meanders through warm temperate rainforest. After enjoying the rainforest, retrace your steps back to the carpark.

Lilly Pilly Link Track

(1 km, 20 minutes. Easy. Suitable for prams) Starting at the footbridge over Tidal River, it is an easy stroll taking in some lovely views overlooking the Tidal River area, the river catchment and Norman Beach. Recently burnt coastal heath communities provide colourful spring flower displays. The track links Tidal River with walks starting from the Lilly Pilly Gully Carpark.

Loo-Errn Track

(1 km, 30 minutes. Easy) Designed for people with limited mobility, Loo Errn track winds its way along the bank of Tidal River. Sections of raised boardwalk protect the delicate wetland habitat and platforms allow easy access for fishing or a pleasant place to rest and admire the scenery. The track gives access to the footbridge over Tidal River. Start at the picnic area in the carpark opposite the Visitor Centre or at First Ramp on the west end of 6th Avenue.

Millars Landing Nature Walk

(2 km, 1 hour. Easy. Suitable for Prams) Millers Landing, on the southern coast of Corner Inlet, shelter the worlds most southern stand of mangroves. The track winds gently downhill through open banksia and stringybark woodland. Descriptive notes in the Discovering the Prom guidebook highlight plant and animal adaptations to this diverse coastal environment.

Millers Landing Link Track

(1 km, 20 mins. Easy) Starting at either end of the link track, this old vehicle track links the Vereker Outlook track to the Millers Landing Nature Walk. From Five Mile Road it heads gently down to join up with the Nature Walk. The banksia woodland in this area provides evidence of past ecological burns, necessary for the health of this community.

Mount Oberon Summit

(3.4 km, 1 hour. Moderate / Hard) Walkers following the management vehicle track to Mt Oberon’s summit will feel the subtle uphill climb, which is noticeably constant. A short series of steps below the summit’s rocky outcrops, leads to rewarding views over Tidal River, the coast and islands off the Prom. Be prepared - it can be windy, cool and clouded over the summit, even during the summer months. Beware of unprotected cliffs. Start at Telegraph Saddle Carpark. A viewing platform near the information shelter in the carpark offers views of the coast.

Mt Bishop Track

(3.7 km, 1 hour. Moderate) Starting at the Lilly Pilly Gully Carpark, to the left of the toilets the track climbs gently through stringybark forest and cool moist fern gullies, and then moderately to Mt Bishop’s rock summit. Breathtaking views over Tidal River and the coast will reward your effort. Beware of unprotected cliffs.

Norman Beach

(Multiple access points, short distances & times. Easy) The safest swimming beach on the west coast is at Norman Beach and Tidal River. Surf south of 5th Ramp to protect swimmers. Access: from 2nd Ramp at Norman Beach Carpark at Tidal River or from 3rd, 4th or 5th ramps along 34th Avenue - park in Norman Beach Carpark as there is no parking along the avenue. Alternatively, begin the walk via the Loo-Errn Track or use one of the access points along 6th Avenue to Tidal River and follow the river down to the beach.

Picnic Bay

(400 metres from carpark. Moderate) A steep track with steps leads down to this beach, which has rock formations at both ends offering a range of intertidal rockpool habitats to explore. A viewing platform is near the carpark. Access: from the Picnic Bay Carpark; from the walking track starting at Squeaky Beach Carpark (1.5 km); or accessible at low tide via the Picnic Point track from Whisky Bay.

Picnic Point

(A short distance above Whisky and Picnic beaches. Easy) A viewing platform on the headland between Whisky and Picnic Bays offers stunning views over the water and across to Norman Island. Access: from Whisky Bay or at low tide from Picnic Bay.

Pillar Point

(1.8 km, 40 minutes. Easy / Moderate) Starting at the footbridge over Tidal River, Pillar Point is a short diversion off the Squeaky Beach Track. This track leads to an outcrop of granite boulders with breathtaking views overlooking Norman and Squeaky Beaches, and the Prom’s offshore islands. Beware of unprotected cliffs.

Sealers Cove

(10.2 km, 3 hours. Moderate / Hard) Starting at the Telegraph Saddle Carpark, a steady climb up to Windy Saddle and then downhill through a beautiful ferny glade and forest, to a boardwalk over Sealers Swamp. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, whalers and timber-cutters used Sealers Cove more than sealers. This secluded beach reveals little of these past industries, except for some old jetty posts that are often exposed by the tide.

South Norman / Little Oberon Bay

(4.1 km, 1.5 hours. Easy / Moderate) This track meanders over sand dunes shrouded in tea tree, to the southern end of Norman Beach (1.5 km) and then climbs gently around the side of Norman Point to Little Oberon Bay. There are fantastic views across the water to the Anser and Glennie groups of islands, including Cleft Island, which is more popularly referred to as Skull Rock. It is 300 metres from the main track to Norman Point. Beware of unprotected cliffs. Start at the Visitor Centre at Tidal River. The track leads off behind the toilet block and turns left at the junction.

Squeaky Beach

Squeaky Beach (300 metres from carpark. Easy)
The rounded grains of quartz on Squeaky Beach make a ‘squeak’ when rubbed together. This happens when you walk on the dry sand. The rock formations at the north end of the beach create a maze of passages for fun exploration. Access: from the Squeaky Beach Carpark or via walk 2 from Tidal River.

Squeaky Beach Track

Squeaky Beach Track (2.1 km, 50 minutes. Moderate)
Starting at the footbridge over Tidal River, this popular track is moderately steep on both sides as it climbs up and over the headland that separates Norman and Leonard Bays and descends to Squeaky Beach, taking in delightful coastal views. A shorter option for this Prom favourite is to walk to the top of the headland and rest on a bench to enjoy the views and then return to Tidal River.

Squeaky, Picnic and Whiskey Beaches

Squeaky Picnic and Whisky Beaches (5.6 km, 2 hours. Easy / Moderate)
This ‘three beaches’ walk offers the best views of the Prom’s west coast and a chance to observe a variety of coastal plant communities. Travel alternates between track and beach walking. Only complete the section between Picnic and Whisky beaches at low tide.
Start from the footbridge over Tidal River and take the track to squeaky Beach. At the north end of Squeaky Beach begin to follow the track out to the carpark but turn left onto the track to Picnic Bay.
You will need to organise a car shuffle or return to Tidal River via the same route.

Telegraph Saddle to Tidal River, via Oberon Bay

Telegraph Saddle to Tidal River, via Oberon Bay (16.9 km, 5.5 hours. Easy / Moderate)
Starting at the Telegraph Saddle Carpark. Make arrangements to collect your car. Follow the closed management vehicle track downhill from Telegraph Saddle for 6 km and turn right to Oberon Bay. From Oberon Bay to Tidal River, travel alternates between beach and track walking. At Norman Beach walk back along the beach to Tidal River or take the track signposted to Tidal River, distances are fairly equal.

Tidal Overlook

Tidal Overlook (1.9 km, 40 minutes. Moderate)
Starting at the footbridge over Tidal River, Tidal Overlook is a vantage point between Norman and Leonard Bays. Take some time to enjoy the views while resting at the quiet place, which is a special area, dedicated to rangers worldwide who have lost their lives in the line of duty.

Tidal Overlook Circuit

Tidal Overlook Circuit (3.8 km, 1.5 hours return. Moderate)
Following from walk 4, the Tidal Overlook circuit continues from the quiet place and heads east to skirt around the side of a small hill. The track descends steeply to join up with the Lilly Pilly Link Track. Turn right to return to the footbridge. Enjoy a lovely view over the river catchment and campground area. Start at the footbridge over Tidal River. It is easier to do the circuit in a clockwise direction.

Tongue Point from Darby River Carpark

Tongue Point from Darby River Carpark (3.8 km, 2 hours. Easy / Moderate)
Starting at the Darby River Carpark, this track passes through wind swept coastal vegetation. Before the junction with the Darby Saddle track a short side track with steps leads down to Fairy Cove. Access to this secluded beach is only at low tide.

Tongue Point from Darby Saddle

Tongue Point from Darby Saddle (5.6 km, 2.5 hours. Moderate / Hard)
Starting at the Darby Saddle Carpark, for spectacular coastal and forest scenery, this is the best route to Tongue Point, a coastal headland jewelled with tumbled stacks and boulders of weathered granite. The track climbs uphill through stringybark and casuarina forest. At 2.1 km a side track (300 metres) leads up to Sparkes Lookout. Views from here go as far south as the pyramid-shaped Rodondo Island and to the north in Shallow Inlet. Shortly after this turn-off, the main track climbs steeply for 800 metres where views across to Norman Island can be enjoyed from Lookout Rocks. From here the track descends steeply through low heathland where it joins the track from Darby River and continues to Tongue Point. The track ends prior to the semi-attached island. For your safety don’t attempt to cross over to it.

Tongue Point, Darby Saddle to Darby River

(9.4 km, 3 - 3.5 hours. Moderate / Hard) Starting at the Darby Saddle Carpark is the easiest direction for enjoying all the sensory delights of the stunning Tongue Point coastal area. Organise a car shuffle or return to Darby Saddle.

Vereker Outlook

(3 km, 1 hour. Moderate) Starting at the Five Mile Carpark, the track climbs gently at first through open banksia woodland that has an understorey of heathland species. Views open up in all directions further along the track as it climbs steeply through the tumble of granite boulders and stringybark forest. Highlights of the walk are the views across Corner Inlet, open heathland and Cotters Beach. This is an ideal walk or picnic destination as the granite formations offer protection from the wind, no matter what direction it blows from.

Whisky Bay

(300 metres from carpark. Easy) This small sheltered beach has rock formations at both ends. The track passes through a moist gully and then follows a small creek before passing over a sand dune to the beach. Access: from the Whisky Bay Carpark; or via the Picnic Point track at the north end of Picnic Bay (accessible only at low tide).

Refuge by Andrew Marshall


Melbourne acoustic musician and Wilsons Promontory enthusiast, Andrew Marshall, wrote a song about Wilsons Prom called Refuge - this is the title track from his debut album. It is an acoustic tune featuring didgeridoo, and is the most-played song from the album on UK radio.